Tucker torpedo prototype




Tucker torpedo prototype

Article Navigation:
  • Photo
  • Rare Tucker 48 Prototype Goes to Auction
  • Video
  • RELATED PAGES
  • The Tucker Torpedo is one of the great what-if stories of automotive history. Preston Tucker hoped to revolutionize the industry with a car unlike.

    The Tucker Torpedo is one of the great what-if stories of automotive history. Preston Tucker hoped to revolutionize the industry with a car unlike any other on the.

    The Tin Goose, as this prototype is known, was the first "Car of Tomorrow" that Preston Tucker built.

    The most famous concept cars are: Cadillac Cyclone, Chevrolet Volt, Ford Nucleon, Phantom Corsair, Pontiac Bonneville Special, Porsche 989, Volvo YCC, BMW GINA, Mercedes-Benz F700, Ford Iosis.

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    When the cars appear at auction, which is rare, they command prices attained by only a few marquee cars. Rumors exist that it was used in a "Bash a Tucker" fundraiser in the s or may have been hauled off from its storage location by a disgruntled renter. During the early s, Tucker was painted a bright red-orange, then later painted black, then lastly painted its present deep metallic blue color in the early s. This had the added advantage of improving weight distribution in the car. All told, 22 transmissions, were found by scouring junkyards, and used car lots.

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    A Look Back At The First Tucker Torpedo Prototype From

    The Tucker 48 named after its model year is an automobile conceived by Preston Tucker and briefly produced in Chicago in Only 51 cars were made before the company ceased operations on March 3, , due to negative publicity initiated by the news media, a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation and a heavily publicized stock fraud trial in which the allegations were proven baseless and led to a full acquittal.

    Ferguson also had a role in the Tucker Corporation's demise. The Man and His Dream is based on the saga surrounding the car's production. The film's director, Francis Ford Coppola , is a Tucker owner and displays his vehicle on the grounds of his winery.

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    The car is commonly referred to as the "Tucker Torpedo". This name was never used in conjunction with the actual production car, and its name was officially "Tucker 48". After World War II, the public was ready for totally new car designs, but the Big Three Detroit automakers had not developed any new models since This provided great opportunities for new, small automakers [ citation needed ] which could develop new cars more rapidly than the huge legacy automakers. Studebaker was the first to introduce an all-new postwar model, but Tucker took a different track, designing a safety car with innovative features and modern styling.

    His specifications called for a water-cooled aluminum block [1] flat-6 rear engine , disc brakes , four-wheel independent suspension , [1] fuel injection , the location of all instruments within reach of the steering wheel, seat belts, and a padded dashboard. Even before the war's end, Preston Tucker began working on plans for his new automobile. In the summer of , he hired noted car designer George S.

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    Lawson to style his new automobile. Tremulis' design was based directly upon the work of George Lawson, but incorporated his own artistic flair. Gordon Lippincott , who updated Tremulis' design just as Tremulis had done with Lawson's. The passenger side of the Lippincott team's clay model they submitted two designs , which incorporated the side profile developed by Tremulis prior to their arrival, was chosen virtually intact for the production automobile's styling.

    The Tucker '48's evolving appearance in the company's press releases and other promotional materials, combined with suggestive statements such as "15 years of testing produced the car of the year"—despite no running prototype existing at the time —were instrumental in the SEC filing mail and conspiracy fraud charges against Preston Tucker.

    Tremulis, like George Lawson, was eventually named the Tucker Corporation's "chief stylist," although the first reference to him holding this position does not appear until , after the Tucker '48's exterior styling was completed.

    Tucker torpedo prototype

    The Tucker automobile was originally named the "Torpedo," but was changed to "Tucker '48" around the time of Lawson's departure and Tremulis' arrival, reportedly because Tucker did not want to remind the public of the horrors of World War II.

    Alex Tremulis has claimed responsibility for dubbing the first prototype automobile the "Tin Goose," which is presently used in a loving manner but at the time was considered derogatory. The Tucker was a pioneer in terms of engineering and safety features. Rear drive had been employed in Tatras and Volkswagens, and headlamps that turned with the front wheels had been available since the s, but they would have been firsts for a modern American production car.

    The Tucker Torpedo Car That Never Was



    • Подписаться по RSSRSS
    • Поделиться VkontakteVkontakte
    • Поделиться на FacebookFacebook
    • Твитнуть!Twitter

    Leave a Reply

    Return to Top ▲TOP ▲